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31 Dec 2015

The Institut Pasteur in Bangui confirms cases of monkeypox virus infection in Central African Republic

The Institut Pasteur in Bangui confirmed cases of monkeypox virus infection in Bangassou about 800 km from Bangui capital city of the Central African Republic.

A team from Doctors without Borders Belgium located in this area at the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, has collected samples from two children of the same family who presented with rashes (maculopapular) after consuming thryonomys meat, a rodent locally known as sibissi.
 
One of the children, aged 9 years died. As the clinical picture was not in favor of a measles infection, highly endemic in Central African Republic, the samples were sent to the Institut Pasteur in Bangui for analysis.
 
The Laboratory of Arboviruses, Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers and of Emerging Zoonotic viruses led by Dr. Emmanuel Nakouné received the samples on December 25th and immediately conducted molecular analyzes that proved positive for monkeypox virus.
 
A team from the Ministry of Health helped by the Institut Pasteur in Bangui went Tuesday, December 29th in the area for an epidemiological investigation around the case. For several years the Institut Pasteur in Bangui has regularly detected monkeyspox micro-outbreaks (1) as part of a surveillance program supported by the Institut Pasteur.
 
Transmitted by wild animals (rodents and primates), the monkeypox virus can cause in human a disease whose symptoms are similar to those of smallpox. This disease can be fatal particularly among children.
 
The Central African Republic is living since 2013 an armed conflict fostering the emergence of infectious diseases. For more than 50 years, the Institut Pasteur in Bangui brings an essential support for surveillance of microbiological and emerging diseases in this region of Central Africa.
 
(1) Berthet N, Nakouné E et al. ; Maculopapular lesions in the Central African Republic. Lancet. 2011 Oct 8;378(9799):1354. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61142-2.

From Institut Pasteur, December 30, 2015.

A team from Doctors without Borders Belgium located in this area at the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, has collected samples from two children of the same family who presented with rashes (maculopapular) after consuming thryonomys meat a rodent locally known as sibissi.

 

One of the children, aged 9 years died. As the clinical picture was not in favor of a measles infections, highly endemic in Central African Republic, the samples were sent to the Institut Pasteur in Bangui for analysis.

 

The Laboratory of Arboviruses, Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers and of Emerging Zoonotic viruses led by Dr. Emmanuel Nakouné  received the samples on December 25th and immediately conducted molecular analyzes that proved positive for monkeypox virus.

 

A team from the Ministry of Health helped by the Institut Pasteur in Bangui went Tuesday, December 29th in the area for an epidemiological investigation around the case. For several years the Institut Pasteur in Bangui has regularly detected monkeyspox micro-outbreaks (1) as part of a surveillance program supported by the Institut Pasteur.

 

Transmitted by wild animals (rodents and primates), the monkeypox virus can cause in human a disease whose symptoms are similar to those of smallpox. This disease can be fatal particularly among children.

 

The Central African Republic is living since 2013 an armed conflict fostering the emergence of infectious diseases. For more than 50 years, the Institut Pasteur in Bangui brings an essential support for surveillance of microbiological and emerging diseases in this region of Central Africa.

 

(1) Berthet N, Nakouné E et al. ; Maculopapular lesions in the Central African Republic.

Lancet. 2011 Oct 8;378(9799):1354. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61142-2.

- See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf

A team from Doctors without Borders Belgium located in this area at the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, has collected samples from two children of the same family who presented with rashes (maculopapular) after consuming thryonomys meat a rodent locally known as sibissi.

 

One of the children, aged 9 years died. As the clinical picture was not in favor of a measles infections, highly endemic in Central African Republic, the samples were sent to the Institut Pasteur in Bangui for analysis.

 

The Laboratory of Arboviruses, Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers and of Emerging Zoonotic viruses led by Dr. Emmanuel Nakouné  received the samples on December 25th and immediately conducted molecular analyzes that proved positive for monkeypox virus.

 

A team from the Ministry of Health helped by the Institut Pasteur in Bangui went Tuesday, December 29th in the area for an epidemiological investigation around the case. For several years the Institut Pasteur in Bangui has regularly detected monkeyspox micro-outbreaks (1) as part of a surveillance program supported by the Institut Pasteur.

 

Transmitted by wild animals (rodents and primates), the monkeypox virus can cause in human a disease whose symptoms are similar to those of smallpox. This disease can be fatal particularly among children.

 

The Central African Republic is living since 2013 an armed conflict fostering the emergence of infectious diseases. For more than 50 years, the Institut Pasteur in Bangui brings an essential support for surveillance of microbiological and emerging diseases in this region of Central Africa.

 

(1) Berthet N, Nakouné E et al. ; Maculopapular lesions in the Central African Republic.

Lancet. 2011 Oct 8;378(9799):1354. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61142-2.

- See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf

A team from Doctors without Borders Belgium located in this area at the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, has collected samples from two children of the same family who presented with rashes (maculopapular) after consuming thryonomys meat a rodent locally known as sibissi.

 

One of the children, aged 9 years died. As the clinical picture was not in favor of a measles infections, highly endemic in Central African Republic, the samples were sent to the Institut Pasteur in Bangui for analysis.

 

The Laboratory of Arboviruses, Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers and of Emerging Zoonotic viruses led by Dr. Emmanuel Nakouné  received the samples on December 25th and immediately conducted molecular analyzes that proved positive for monkeypox virus.

 

A team from the Ministry of Health helped by the Institut Pasteur in Bangui went Tuesday, December 29th in the area for an epidemiological investigation around the case. For several years the Institut Pasteur in Bangui has regularly detected monkeyspox micro-outbreaks (1) as part of a surveillance program supported by the Institut Pasteur.

 

Transmitted by wild animals (rodents and primates), the monkeypox virus can cause in human a disease whose symptoms are similar to those of smallpox. This disease can be fatal particularly among children.

 

The Central African Republic is living since 2013 an armed conflict fostering the emergence of infectious diseases. For more than 50 years, the Institut Pasteur in Bangui brings an essential support for surveillance of microbiological and emerging diseases in this region of Central Africa.

 

(1) Berthet N, Nakouné E et al. ; Maculopapular lesions in the Central African Republic.

Lancet. 2011 Oct 8;378(9799):1354. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61142-2.

- See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf

A team from Doctors without Borders Belgium located in this area at the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, has collected samples from two children of the same family who presented with rashes (maculopapular) after consuming thryonomys meat a rodent locally known as sibissi.

 

One of the children, aged 9 years died. As the clinical picture was not in favor of a measles infections, highly endemic in Central African Republic, the samples were sent to the Institut Pasteur in Bangui for analysis.

 

The Laboratory of Arboviruses, Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers and of Emerging Zoonotic viruses led by Dr. Emmanuel Nakouné  received the samples on December 25th and immediately conducted molecular analyzes that proved positive for monkeypox virus.

 

A team from the Ministry of Health helped by the Institut Pasteur in Bangui went Tuesday, December 29th in the area for an epidemiological investigation around the case. For several years the Institut Pasteur in Bangui has regularly detected monkeyspox micro-outbreaks (1) as part of a surveillance program supported by the Institut Pasteur.

 

Transmitted by wild animals (rodents and primates), the monkeypox virus can cause in human a disease whose symptoms are similar to those of smallpox. This disease can be fatal particularly among children.

 

The Central African Republic is living since 2013 an armed conflict fostering the emergence of infectious diseases. For more than 50 years, the Institut Pasteur in Bangui brings an essential support for surveillance of microbiological and emerging diseases in this region of Central Africa.

 

(1) Berthet N, Nakouné E et al. ; Maculopapular lesions in the Central African Republic.

Lancet. 2011 Oct 8;378(9799):1354. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61142-2.

- See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf
The Institut Pasteur in Bangui confirmed cases of monkeypox virus infection in Bangassou about 800 km from Bangui capital city of the Central African Republic. - See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf
The Institut Pasteur in Bangui confirmed cases of monkeypox virus infection in Bangassou about 800 km from Bangui capital city of the Central African Republic. - See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf
The Institut Pasteur in Bangui confirmed cases of monkeypox virus infection in Bangassou about 800 km from Bangui capital city of the Central African Republic. - See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf
The Institut Pasteur in Bangui confirmed cases of monkeypox virus infection in Bangassou about 800 km from Bangui capital city of the Central African Republic. - See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf
The Institut Pasteur in Bangui confirmed cases of monkeypox virus infection in Bangassou about 800 km from Bangui capital city of the Central African Republic. - See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf
The Institut Pasteur in Bangui confirmed cases of monkeypox virus infection in Bangassou about 800 km from Bangui capital city of the Central African Republic. - See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-bangui-confirms-cases-monkeypox-virus-infection-central-african-republic#sthash.4wPF4Cvx.dpuf

28 Dec 2015

VIDEO: The mechanism of an AIDS vaccine candidate filmed in vivo

Using innovative technology, scientists from the Dynamics of Immune Responses Unit (Institut Pasteur / Inserm / VRI) directed by Philippe Bousso have filmed in vivo the process by which an AIDS vaccine candidate, developed by the French Vaccine Research Institute and the ANRS, triggers the immune response. This previously unseen footage clearly shows how the vaccine recruits the immune cells needed to destroy infected cells. These results, published in the journal Nature Medicine on December 21, 2015, shed new light on the mode of action and potential of this vaccine.

 
The film shows the cells targeted by the vaccine MVA-HIV rapidly activating the inflammasome (green circled dots) and dying. This trigger signal leads to a massive mobilization of the immune system cells.
 
The study:
 

Please visit Institut Pasteur website for more details.

You can also visit the Dynamics of Immune Responses Lab website for contacts and publications information.

21 Dec 2015

The Institut Pasteur in French Guiana has detected the first case of Zika virus in French Guiana

The virology laboratory of the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana (National Reference Centre for arboviruses, associated laboratory for the Antilles and French Guiana) has recently confirmed the first case of Zika virus in Guiana. To date, no local transmission has been identified. This case was imported from the neighboring Surinam where the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana virology laboratory already confirmed last month the first case of Zika virus infection.

The team from the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana, including epidemiologists, entomologists, virologists and physicians, were mobilized to investigate a group of people at risk of infection following a stay in Suriname.

Facing this first case in this French region, the senior management of the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana immediately informed the Regional Health Agency who, with the General Council and the local branch of the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance (CIRE Antilles Guyane), had already deployed heightened monitoring and intervention measures. In addition, an action plan is underway to prevent the spread of the disease in this region.

An other case has been confirmed in Martinique, and the Zika virus is currently spreading in Latin America: 9 countries have reported cases of Zika virus infection (Brazil, Guatemala, El Salvador, Paraguay, Venezuela, Mexico, Colombia, Chile, and Panama).

The Zika virus is transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, like Dengue and Chinkungunya viruses. It causes mild fever, rash (mostly maculo-papular), headaches, arthralgia, myalgia, asthenia, and non-purulent conjunctivitis, occurring about three to twelve days after the mosquito vector bite. One out of four people may not develop symptoms, but in those who are affected the disease is usually mild with symptoms that can last between two and seven days (WHO). However, its dangerousness is raising concerns as recent increases in microcephaly among infants born to women infected with the virus have been noticed in Brazil (PAHO/WHO).

The presence of Zika virus in America was confirmed for the first time in April 2015. The origin of the virus is still under investigation but it may have been introduced to Brazil at the time of the 2014 football World Cup in the region of Bahia. The virus may have then spread to other states of Brazil. The absence of ecological barrier and the numerous population flows between border countries let presume that the Zika virus was going to spread in South America, especially in countries regularly facing dengue epidemics. Health authorities were on alert and watched for the virus outbreaks.

Photo credits: http://www.pasteur.fr

The virology laboratory of the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana (National Reference Centre for arboviruses, associated laboratory for the Antilles and French Guiana) has just confirmed the first case of Zika virus in Guiana. To date, no local transmission has been identified. This case was imported from the neighboring Surinam where the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana virology laboratory already confirmed last month the first case of Zika virus infection.

 

The team from the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana, including epidemiologists, entomologists, virologists and physicians, were mobilized to investigate a group of people at risk of infection following a stay in Suriname.

 

Facing this first case in this French region, the senior management of the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana immediately informed the Regional Health Agency who, with the General Council and the local branch of the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance (CIRE Antilles Guyane), had already deployed heightened monitoring and intervention measures. In addition, an action plan is underway to prevent the spread of the disease in this region.

- See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-french-guiana-detects-first-case-zika-virus-french-guiana#sthash.DhzU9aYo.dpuf

The virology laboratory of the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana (National Reference Centre for arboviruses, associated laboratory for the Antilles and French Guiana) has just confirmed the first case of Zika virus in Guiana. To date, no local transmission has been identified. This case was imported from the neighboring Surinam where the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana virology laboratory already confirmed last month the first case of Zika virus infection.

 

The team from the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana, including epidemiologists, entomologists, virologists and physicians, were mobilized to investigate a group of people at risk of infection following a stay in Suriname.

 

Facing this first case in this French region, the senior management of the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana immediately informed the Regional Health Agency who, with the General Council and the local branch of the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance (CIRE Antilles Guyane), had already deployed heightened monitoring and intervention measures. In addition, an action plan is underway to prevent the spread of the disease in this region.

- See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-french-guiana-detects-first-case-zika-virus-french-guiana#sthash.DhzU9aYo.dpuf

The virology laboratory of the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana (National Reference Centre for arboviruses, associated laboratory for the Antilles and French Guiana) has just confirmed the first case of Zika virus in Guiana. To date, no local transmission has been identified. This case was imported from the neighboring Surinam where the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana virology laboratory already confirmed last month the first case of Zika virus infection.

 

The team from the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana, including epidemiologists, entomologists, virologists and physicians, were mobilized to investigate a group of people at risk of infection following a stay in Suriname.

 

Facing this first case in this French region, the senior management of the Institut Pasteur in French Guiana immediately informed the Regional Health Agency who, with the General Council and the local branch of the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance (CIRE Antilles Guyane), had already deployed heightened monitoring and intervention measures. In addition, an action plan is underway to prevent the spread of the disease in this region.

- See more at: http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/news-institut-pasteur/institut-pasteur-french-guiana-detects-first-case-zika-virus-french-guiana#sthash.DhzU9aYo.dpuf

01 Dec 2015

NEW DEADLINE for application: 4th One Health Course, 4 – 20 April 2016, Institut Pasteur Paris

The online registration date for the 4th One Health course has been extended to december the 10th, 2015.

The 4th One Health course will provide an overview of different disciplines contributing to the One Health concept and will point to strategies to detect, identify and control pathogens during outbreaks.

For more information and registration please visit:

http://www.pasteur.fr/fr/education/workshops/4th-one-health-course